KING MORELLI – “We’re Coming” – instrumental

KING MORELLI – “We’re Coming” – instrumental

In anticipation of KING MORELLI’s new album, I share with you the beat behind the our track: “We’re Coming” I’d been listening to a lot of James Blake when I did this, but when KING came over and shared his idea for a song over the beat, it shifted. The vibe needed some guitar love, so I asked NYC based STL guitar wizard and engineer to lay some ideas down.  The human element added so much more depth, so I decided to add drums.  KING contacted another high school friend of ours, Grover Stewart to see if he’d be into tracking something,  so over Thanksgiving, we hopped into RED PILL STUDIOS in St. Louis with Jacob Detering and laid down a few takes. Wait for the big 808 DROPS at the...
Modern Monday Eshericks

Modern Monday Eshericks

Modern Monday back to introducing new artists that are using computers, synths, filters, and everything at their modern disposal.  This week I want to introduce an artist named Eshericks. Eshericks His music is a kind of spin off the Drum and Bass genre called BREAKS.   I asked him to explain the difference between Drum and Bass and Breaks, but I’m guessing that breaks is just busy cutting up the music more where Drum and Bass is more concerned about being fast and double time dub. (still not clear!!!) from his website below: Producer/Remixer/DJ The Breakspoll International Awards Nominee, Eshericks has quickly grabbed the attention of todays dance music community since his debut in 2008. He is a DJ and Producer who specializes in building multi-track synthesized sounds and compiling them with raw recordings of vocal and/or instrumental elements. This approach lets him explore seemingly unrelated combination of sounds which may surprise many of those who believe in conventional methods of production. His sound is ambient yet also incorporating those heavy drops and bass-in-your-face action that many of his fans look for at his gigs.        Listen for yourself! I did a track with Eshericks for the high-end music solutions company “RINGMASTERS.CC”  Of which we are both members. I basically laid down a tempo and a whole bunch of improvised bass lines on the upright and he worked his magic.  Pretty awesome stuff! Anyway, I’ve been following his music on the site SOUNDCLOUD and he does some pretty incredible sounding remixes.  I’ll have to go see him spin at Club Asia one of these days.  He is usually...
Top 10 Synth pioneers

Top 10 Synth pioneers

I’m walking a fine line here in making a list of top ten synth musicians, because I’m aware that in the world of music concrete, there are many amazing synth operators who created and pioneered amazing sounds.  My favorites are mostly harmonic synth players. This is a list of primarily non-inharmonic synth pioneers.  Of course there were many more inharmonic synth musicians, but here are people who focused their efforts on using synths in place of modern instruments or just as modern harmonic instruments. Here are my top 10! Check out my favorite clips of these artists: 10. Delia Derbyshire Was an English musician and composer of electronic music and musique concrète. She is best known for her electronic realisation of Ron Grainer’s theme music to the British science fiction television series Doctor Who and for her work with the BBC Radiophonic Workshop. At the Radiophonic Workshop, she worked with a team of engineers and musicians to develop electronic means to creating music.  Mostly with sampling and splicing.   Splicing is the meticulous work of cutting audio tape and sticking it back together to create a loop.  There’s a great video of her above demonstrating. 9. Klaus Shulze The first Tangerine Dream album, Electronic Meditation, was a tape-collage Krautrock piece, using the technology of the time rather than the synthesized music they later became famous for. The line-up for the album was Froese, Klaus Schulze, and Conrad Schnitzler. Electronic Meditation was published by Ohr in 1970, and began the period known as the Pink Years (the Ohr logo was a pink ear). But starting with their second album, Alpha Centauri,...
Modern Monday Tomita Isao

Modern Monday Tomita Isao

Following Vangelis and Wendy Carlos, I found Tomita to be another incredibly fascinating pioneer of electronic music.  It seems he is best known for his album  Snowflakes are Dancing which features the music of Claude Debussy.  (one of my favorites!) He also used synthesizers like Wendy Carlos in a very expressive way, but he had his own sounds.  He really developed his own particular palate of synth sounds and tended to add his own parts here and there. Using reverbs, different filters, he created many space like sounds.  He cleverly developed a way to transport the listener to another place.  It’s wonderful headphone music! Read his profile in more detail below! Isao Tomita (冨田 勲), often known simply as Tomita, is a Japanese music composer, regarded as one of the pioneers of electronic music and space music, and as one of the most famous producers of analog synthesizer arrangements In addition to creating note-by-note realizations, Tomita made extensive use of the sound design capabilities of his instrument, using synthesizers to create new artificial sounds to accompany and enhance his electronic realizations of acoustic instruments.  He also made effective use of analog music sequencers[1] and featured futuristic science fiction themes, while laying the foundations for synth-pop music and trance-like rhythms.  He also received fourGrammy Award nominations for his album Snowflakes are Dancing in 1974 The album’s contributions to electronic music included an ambience resembling a symphony orchestra, the use of reverberation, the use of phasing and flanging to create a spatial audio effect with stereo speakers, electronic surround sound using four speakers, realistic string simulations, portamento whistles, and abstract bell-like sounds created using ring modulation. A particularly significant achievement was its polyphonic sound, which was created without the use of any polyphonic synthesizers (which were not yet commercially released). Tomita created the album’s polyphonic sound by recording selections one part at a time, taking 14 months to produce the album. In his...

Modern Monday Vangelis

Vangelis…oh man Vangelis. Possibly one of the biggest musical heroes out of Greece in the last 100 years. Vangelis is a world-renowned Greek composer, keyboardist, and multi-instrumentalist. He mainly composes instrumental and film music and he performs all the music by himself. I have almost all of his recorded works and really enjoy listening to his approach to using synthesizers.  Like Wendy Carlos he treated the synth like a synth and truly had his own original voice as an electronic musician. Evangelos Odysseas Papathanassiou (Greek: Ευάγγελος Οδυσσέας Παπαθανασίου [evˈaɲɟelos oðiˈseas papaθanaˈsiu]) (born 29 March 1943) is a Greek composer of electronic, progressive, ambient, jazz, pop rock and orchestral music, under the artist name Vangelis (English pronunciation: /væŋˈɡɛlɨs/).[1] He is best known for his Academy Award-winning score for the film Chariots of Fire, and scores for the films Blade Runner, 1492: Conquest of Paradise and Alexander. Vangelis began his professional musical career working with several popular bands of the 1960s such as The Forminx and Aphrodite’s Child, with the latter’s album 666 going on to be recognized as a psychedelic “classic”.[2] Throughout the 1970s, Vangelis composed music scores for several animal documentaries, including L’Apocalypse Des Animaux, La Fête sauvage and Opéra sauvage; the success of these scores brought him into the film scoring mainstream. In the early 1980s, Vangelis formed a musical partnership with Jon Anderson, the lead singer of progressive rock band Yes, and the duo went on to release several albums together as Jon & Vangelis. In 1981, he composed the score for the Oscar-winning film Chariots of Fire. The soundtrack’s single, “Titles”, won Vangelis the Academy Award for...

Modern Monday Dreams set to music part II

Every once in a blue moon, I have recurring dreams. This dream has unfolded slowly as I’ve gotten older. This music represents the first time I had this dream. I’ll call this “Under the Victorian home” Listen: Read: It’s starts with me outside of a big old Victorian style house in a suburban area. I’m with distant cousins and some older friends. The home belongs to one of their deceased relatives and is abandoned. We approach the dark home and open the doors to a dank, dusty, yet beautiful dark oak foyer with a proper chandelier and strange statue like figures draped with white sheets. The floor is dark with a large Persian rug.  The decorations and overall feel is quite noble, like the house belonged to a governor. We carefully explore the building and eventually manage to get the electricity going. The house doesn’t have that scary horror vibe you might expect but rather a charming, yet slightly strange “Maniac Mansion” feel. Eventually we find the basement door and the guy whose family owned the house shouts “oh this is it!!! You gotta see the basement!!” We then descend. There’s nothing scary at all about the basement. It’s lit by a bunch of bare GE incandescent light bulbs strung across the rafters in a kind of charming slightly dangerous way. The floor is a yellowish linoleum. The walls are lined with shelves from the floor to about 4 feet high. On the shelves, every shelf is a whole assortment of old fashioned toys (1930’s / 40’s) Fire trucks, robots, airplanes, wooden cars, trucks, balls…you name it!!!    ...